OPINION: Kenya’s efforts in bringing together all regional forces for peace in DRC admirable

OPINION: Kenya’s efforts in bringing together all regional forces for peace in DRC admirable

President William Ruto and Burundi President and Chairperson of the EAC Heads of State Summit Evariste Ndayishimiye. Photo/PPS

  • What Ruto’s administration seems to be doing now is taking a more realistic look at what Kenya and its regional security issues threatening the economic and political stability of the countries in the region are and what security alliances can be expected to achieve.

By Dan Weku, Security Policy Analyst

The thinking concerning the regional security policy of East Africa is changing the hysteria that existed around the nature of security alliance to a much less hysterical approach.

What this change perhaps shows most clearly is the impact of the recent changes in political leadership in the region.

What Ruto’s administration seems to be doing now is taking a more realistic look at what Kenya and its regional security issues threatening the economic and political stability of the countries in the region are and what security alliances can be expected to achieve.

The greatest dangers are in DRC, ravaged by war, rebellion, reign of terrorism, civil strife, unemployment, sharp inflation, and dwindling resources — a series of humanitarian problems.

Kenya has occupied centre stage and has taken the lead in reaffirming the region of the moral obligation of a grateful nation and the human security imperative to support democracy-building for a future that is positive so that young people in Congo can not only experience the benefits of it but will be less ready to join militia groups.

President Ruto may not be the most charismatic African leader, but his presidency comes at a time when the region today is at an age of polarization.

Specifically, the previous administration had become illogical and unprincipled in its efforts to achieve regional policy ends. The division of opinion ran so strong that no one was willing to listen to the other side, and because of that, many issues could be resolved by bringing the regional countries together which remain unsolved today.

In recent decades the region has been caught in the crossfire as a prime ideological battleground between East and West, as well as a battleground for those who claim to speak for impoverished landless masses demanding a share of their nation’s wealth and opportunities against those acting in the interest of foreign powers.

The strategic position of Kenya adds materially to the importance of its new role in the peacekeeping mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo for the benefit of common security.

Although East African security concerns such as the implementation of disarmament and demobilisation process take centre stage, every so often, talks on regional trade relations shifts into the spotlight of attention.

Kenya’s efforts in bringing together all regional sources lay a foundation plan that can be implemented over many years and one that can stimulate growth to increase trade, create jobs, raise incomes, expand employment and business opportunities, and promote regional peace.

Additionally, the Kenya contingent, under the sponsorship of the East African Community Regional Force. (EACRF) is a consolidated entity with impressive capabilities corresponding with real operational conditions.

Kenya has well-developed structures in place, beginning with its formidable military arsenal as a longer-term military solution. All of this ties in very well with the president’s pledge to work with individual countries and the network of regional organisations to undertake any necessary and reasonable measures to develop, more crucially an enlightened policy.

Yet, although regional accords might sometimes be challenging to world peace since they might tend in some circumstances to introduce a sort of prewar system of coalitions, Ruto’s administration understands the concerns and seems to be moving rapidly to seek new solutions that are more of a conciliation than confrontational.

A peaceful progressive region is an adjustability in which investors can invest more freely and organizations provide funding priorities that will see the delivery of services in the region.

This will elevate the quality of life of the population to other regions as Kenya continues to lead at the front in providing humanitarian relief to populations affected by violence.

Dr Dan Weku is currently an assistant lecturer to Dr Herve Tchumkam the author of State Power, Stigmatization, and Youth Resistance Culture in the French Banlieues: Uncanny Citizenship and Precarious Lives and Marginal Bodies in North Africa: Homo Expendibilis at Southern Methodist University (SMU) in Dallas, Texas.

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DRC President Ruto Dr Dan Weku regional peace

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