3 in 10 firms retain remote work arrangements: Survey

3 in 10 firms retain remote work arrangements: Survey

  • Compared across the region, the findings for Kenya closely mirror those in Nigeria and South Africa affirming remote working as a permanent fixture across workplaces on the continent.
  • Despite the growing preference for remote work, Kenyan firms are yet to effectively train workers on cyber security.
  • Incidents of variants such as Delta and Omicron in 2021 has resulted in some firms adopting a wait and see approach with regards to implementing return to work formulas.

34 per cent of three of every 10 Kenya firms have retained remote working arrangements as part of their work policy according to a new survey.

The survey by KnowBe4, a South African based integrated security awareness training platform, further shows an equal number of firms have sustained remote working but on flexible policies.

Meanwhile, 37 per cent of surveyed firms say they have either fully returned to the office or plan to do so in the foreseeable future.

100 firms gave responses to the survey with the roles of respondents broken down into middle management, IT, executive management and consultants.

Compared across the region, the findings for Kenya closely mirror those in Nigeria and South Africa affirming remote working as a permanent fixture across workplaces on the continent.

Despite the growing preference for remote work, Kenyan firms are yet to effectively train workers on cyber security.

For instance, only 16 per cent of respondents in the survey completely agreed that their employees had the ability to recognize and mitigate the cyber threats.

Other remote working concerns cited in the survey range from the lack of infrastructure at home, challenges in setting up of remote working infrastructure and the lack of team identity.

Just under half of respondents in the survey or 46 per cent reported that they had experienced cyber security incidents across the past year with the greatest threats coming in the form of malware followed by ransomware and social engineering.

In spite of the notable vulnerabilities in the form of cyber risks, local firms have barely increased their security budgets to meet the changing needs.

Only 21 per cent of respondents noted increases in the budgets but at an insignificant rate.

The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in March of 2020 flung remote working to the forefront but the work arrangement has taken a back foot in the wake of easing containment measures.

However, the incidents of variants such as Delta and Omicron in 2021 has resulted in some firms adopting a wait and see approach with regards to implementing return to work formulas.

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