'Political Parties Bill should be law by end of January,' Majority Leader Kimunya says

'Political Parties Bill should be law by end of January,'  Majority Leader Kimunya says

Majority Leader Amos Kimunya. PHOTO| COURTESY

  • Majority Leader Amos Kimunya who says the National Assembly intends to deal with the amendments in the next three days before forwarding the bill to the Senate for concurrence.

The Political Parties (Amendment) Bill 2021 should be law by the end of this month.

This is according to Majority Leader Amos Kimunya who says the National Assembly intends to deal with the amendments in the next three days before forwarding the bill to the Senate for concurrence.

“By the end of January we should be done with this Bill and the President accented to it, because we want to use it in the August elections, for that to happen we need to give all the players in the elections ample time to familiarize with the law,” Kimunya said.

Kimunya also expressed confidence that this time round they will finish up with the many amendments proposed to the Bill in the 3 days gazetted for special sittings.

He says they have marshalled enough numbers to ensure the Bill passes as proposed, and urged his fellow legislators to debate soberly according to the House rules.

“I hope the emotions have reduced, some of the MPs with proposed amendments have even given me an indication that they will be dropping them, so we are hoping we will deal with the Bill in two days and rest on the third day,” Kimunya said.

Majority Whip Emmanuel Wangwe also expressed confidence that they have the numbers to pass the proposed law despite opposition from MPs allied to Deputy President William Ruto.

He said they have done enough lobbying to ensure all the amendments that are proposed by the proponents of the Bill are carried but asked for a sober debate.

“I hope MPs will be sober this time, but we must also accept that politics is not a church service, sometimes these things happen, but we are confident we have the numbers and we will carry the day,” Wangwe said.

However, MPs allied to Deputy President William Ruto threatened to take the law to the courts as they claim it has not gone through all the stages that are required.

“I wonder why they are chest-thumping, this Bill would never survive if it’s taken to court. It has issues with public participation, clauses that clog and fester democracy in the country, so my view is fine, let him use the numbers in Parliament and we will go to court,” Tharaka MP George Murugara retorted.

His Belgut counterpart Nelson Koech dismissed claims that the DP didn’t have numbers in parliament, saying all other major players have teamed up against him.

“We will intensively debate every clause in that Bill, it’s our job to protect Kenyans and ensure that they don’t force laws that benefit just a few people. If the Bill goes through, then we have always had the option of going to court," he said.

The Bill has elicited political heat in the recent past with last week’s special sitting being marred by violence that led to the suspension of Minority leader John Mbadi.

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