PS Kibicho reveals gov’t was restocking teargas every week, spent Ksh10M a month on police during 2017 post-election chaos

PS Kibicho reveals gov’t was restocking teargas every week, spent Ksh10M a month on police during 2017 post-election chaos

  • Speaking in Lamu on Sunday, Kibicho, who was PS for Interior then, said the state spent 10 million shillings monthly on the police who would be used to contain demonstrations.
  • “When I was Interior PS in 2017 I would run out of teargas stock every week, and the police officers involved can ascertain,” said Kibicho.

Interior Principal Secretary Dr. Karanja Kibicho has divulged that the government was replenishing its teargas supply on a weekly basis during the chaos surrounding the 2017 general elections.

Speaking in Lamu on Sunday, Kibicho, who was PS for Interior then, said the state spent 10 million shillings monthly on the police who would be used to contain demonstrations.

“When I was Interior PS in 2017 I would run out of teargas stock every week, and the police officers involved can ascertain,” said Kibicho.

“Every month we used to spend 10 million shillings to pay police officers to go and beat demonstrators. That was the Kenya we lived in,” he added.

The PS further stated that it was until the handshake between President Uhuru Kenyatta and then-opposition leader Raila Odinga that they could afford to have teargas remaining in stock.

“Today teargas is going stale in our stores, we are even wondering which country we should donate it to because we have no use with it,” said Kibicho.

Following the announcement of the 2017 general elections results in August and the annulment of President Kenyatta's win on grounds that that the election commission had not followed the constitution and the electoral laws, opposition supporters held regular protests in the Mombasa, Kisumu and Nairobi, pushing for electoral changes before a fresh election is held.

The demonstrations constituted many cases of violent clashes among demonstrators and police.

In October, the government would later ban the demonstrations, citing a need to protect Kenyans and their property.